Bone Broth Makes You Strong, Sane and Ravishingly Beautiful

 

Valued by cooks, wise elders and healers for centuries, Bone Broth is an ancient longevity tonic that couldn’t be easier to make at home. Having gone on hiatus for the last 50 years or so, this magical concoction is making a fierce comeback, and I’ll be the first to rejoice in one glorious ‘Hallelujah!’.

Revered for it’s ability to boost the immune system, nourish fertility, build strong bones and teeth, warm the digestive fire, recover the gut, and deeply nourish the sick, the recovering, the young and elderly, Bone Broth provides some of the greatest resources we can get from food. And considering how easy and inexpensive Bone Broth is to make, it’s time we reestablish it’s importance in all healthy diets.

7 Ways Bone Broth Improves Your Health:

Bones build bones and strengthen cartilage, tendons and muscles.

Bone marrow builds blood, which improves brain function, memory and eyesight & nourishes your hair, skin, nails and general vitality.

Bone Broth nourishes the kidney system, the part of the body most directly linked to fertility and longevity.

Bone Broth helps to heal those who are suffering from chronic illness.

Bone Broth replenishes our deep reserves, nourishing new moms directly after childbirth and while breastfeeding.

Bone Broth heals gut lining for conditions such as poor digestion & leaky gut.

Bone Broth helps to calm a frazzled nervous system by building blood and nourishing nutrient deficiencies that lead to food cravings, anxiety & insomnia.

Tips For A Superior Broth:

*Only use bones from organic, pastured animals.

*Save all bones from the meat you cook at home by putting them in a plastic bag in the freezer until you have enough to make a new batch.

*To make a richer broth, roast the bones first. This is delicious, but if you don’t have the time, it’s not necessary for success.

*You can buy bones from your butcher, farmer, or health food store.

Ingredients:

About 3 lbs of Bones (or 1 whole turkey carcass)

6 Ribs of Celery, with Leaves, cut into thirds

4-5 Carrots, cut into ½ or thirds

2 Onions, cut into quarters

2-4 Cloves Garlic, unpeeled

4-6 Bay Leaves

12-20 Whole Peppercorns

1-2 Tbs Cider Vinegar

Fresh Herbs such as Thyme, Rosemary, Parsley or Oregano

2 Tbs Sea Salt

Instructions:

{Optional} Roast Bones in the oven on 375* for 1 hour. Add vegetables & garlic, then continue to roast another 30 minutes. Bones and vegetables should be well browned.

Crockpot Method:

Put all of the roasted bones, veggies & garlic into a crockpot. Add bay leaves, peppercorns, cider vinegar, herbs & salt, and cover with water, leaving about 1 ½” of space at the top. Turn crockpot on high, and simmer for 24 hours. You may need to add more water to keep everything covered, but it’s typically not necessary when using the crockpot.

Stovetop Method:

Put all of the roasted bones, veggies & garlic into a large stockpot (tall soup pot, with a lid). Add bay leaves, peppercorns, cider vinegar, herbs & salt, and cover with water, by about 3”.

Turn on high, until water just starts to boil, then lower heat to a simmer. Keep covered and simmer for 24 hours. Make sure to check the water level every few hours, and especially before going to bed.

After 24 hours, turn off the heat, and allow the broth to cool for about an hour.

You can dig out all of the bones & veggies with a slotted spoon and tongs, or you can set up a strainer in your kitchen sink. I typically cook my broth in the crockpot, so I take my big stock pot and put it in the sink with a strainer on top. Pour the liquid out slowly, and be careful when the bones & vegetables start to fall into the strainer. Allow it to sit for 3-5 minutes so all of the broth drips from the solids. I always give my dog the carrots, and throw out the rest. They are pretty mushy and taste like chicken, so he enjoys the treat!

If the broth is not yet cool, move your stockpot back to a cool burner on the stovetop or on a trivet. Cool for 1-2 hours, then pour into storage containers and keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 days, or in the freezer for 1-2 months.

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